High Schools

Seguin High School

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Seguin High School

Seguin ISD


Seguin High School is designed to accommodate 2,450 students within approximately 470,000 square feet of new and renovated learning environments. The design and construction of this new comprehensive high school responds to the school district’s 2013 Bond Committee’s program of space and education needs that fulfills the academic vision of the school board and community.


Furr High School

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Furr High School

Houston ISD


The new 1,300-student high school will replace the 54-year-old current building and bring it up to 21st century learning environment standards. The design of the school includes collaborative and project-based learning environments. ERO Architects used design metaphors that respect the history, culture and people of Furr’s community, with environments such as the Oate Prairie, respecting its history; the family room, allowing students to feel more at home; and the shopping mall, providing creative and engaging ways to socialize, learn and study.


Dr. Abraham P. Cano Freshman Academy

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Dr. Abraham P. Cano Freshman Academy at Harlingen

Harlingen CISD


A college campus style and other 21st century learning environment design elements were applied to the Dr. Abraham P. Cano Freshman Academy at Harlingen Consolidated Independent School District. This freshman academy is the Rio Grande Valley’s newest high school and is set to open in fall 2013.

Together with Harlingen CISD stakeholders, ERO Architects developed a plan with a 21st century vision that emphasized integrating innovative strategies and designs to enhance student achievement.

“Today’s kids are digital learners. They take in the world via the filter of computing devices,” added Ochoa. The school supports project-based learning in the five Achieve Texas Career clusters, which are education and training; health science; science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM); business management and administration; and liberal arts.

“A school that looks and feels like a college campus is a sure way to enhance college-readiness,” added Ochoa. “At the center of the campus is an intimate courtyard making it a perfect place for social interacting, group learning and quiet reflection.”

“The curriculum and design of the Dr. Abraham P. Cano Freshman Academy ensures that our students will have special attention during this important transition in their academic careers,” said Harlingen Consolidated Independent School District Superintendent Dr. Steve Flores. “To put our students at the forefront, we must embrace change and innovation. The Academy is one step toward completing our district’s transformation for the benefit of student success in the 21st century.”

Learning spaces and the shape of education will continue to evolve. Those involved in the planning process can aspire design schools of the future that will accommodate ever-evolving technology and education that will shape students, faculty and the community for years to come.


PSJA Thomas Jefferson Early College High School

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Thomas Jefferson T-STEM Early College High School

PSJA ISD


With an enrollment of 500 students this T-STEM school is centered around science, technology, engineering and math. This early college high school emphasises a rigorous curriculum in a college-type setting. With a college campus feel, the student success center is not typical of a high school.

With 24 classrooms and six science classrooms, each with a full retrofit, the center benefits from state-of-the-art learning including interactive white boards and full AV capabilities. The vernacular design approach respects the original 1927 building and the additional three buildings that were added as the school increased in size.


Edcouch-Elsa High School

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Edcouch-Elsa High School

Edcouch-Elsa ISD


This is a two-story example of a state-of-the-art prep building. The building anchors the campus that is being developed on a north-south axis. This layout allows for pedestrian walkways through the spine of the campus. The 9th grade building offers students emotional and physical comfort among peers while making the upcoming transition into high school.

The exterior of the building combines various colors of split-faced block with metal on the facade. This unique project has administration, library and cafeteria on the first floor with science labs on the second. The building respects the land and continuation of the current high school design.


Palmview High School

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Palmview High School

La Joya ISD


The design theme of this project is “respecting the people”. Set in a largely poor and rural populated area of the South Texas border region, this campus serves as the center of the community. Internally, the school is designed in a campus-type setting creating smaller “learning communities” with outdoor plazas and courtyards which encourage intellectual curiosity, critical inquiry and social learning. The buildings feature an environmentally mindful design incorporating visual comfort, color perception and fullspectrum daylighting.

The program initially required for a full service high school serving a population of 1,600 students. Because of the rapidly growing community population the design requirements were changed from 1,600 students to 2,000 students, to 2,400 students and finally to 2,800 students. The campus-type plan allowed for the master planning of individual buildings which could be added to the campus to meet the dynamically growing community population. In addition to the core academic areas, the campus provides two large Career and Technology Education buildings, a Performing Arts building, a Cafetorium building, a Physical Education building, and a second General Classroom and Science building. The 80 acre site sports a Sub-Varsity Football Stadium, a Baseball Stadium, a Softball Stadium, and five football/soccer practice fields.